Brimer/Russell  Family
Germany, SC, NC, TN, VA

William Brimer of  SC/NC
Son of Hans Brimer;  Revolutionary War Soldier;  Husband of Elizabeth Elgin

 The Brimer webpages are contributed in large part by Michael L. Brimer, California. If you have questions, please feel free to contact him at sgm67@outlook.com
and he will try to help you personally.  Thanks Mike!

All information is as accurate as we can make it at this point in time, but mistakes do occur, for which we welcome your corrections, questions, suggestions, and updated information.  Our goal is to continue to make these web pages interesting and accurate a portrayal of this line of Brimers as we can.

Hans Michael Jurig Brimer
TO
 Benjamin Brimer
 TO
William Brimer
TO
William S. Brimer
TO
 John Stewart Brimer
TO
 Stephen R. Brimer
TO
 Paul Tinsley Brimer
 

GENERATION #3   William Brimer of  NC/TN
Hans' Grandson and Benjamin's Son
Born 2 Jan 1759 (NC); Died 16 July 1834 (TN)
Husband of Elizabeth Elgin

Sons of the American Revolution registration number: P-121220
Daughters of the American Revolution registration number: A-129625

1759:  Born January 2,1759 in NC to Benjamin and Rebecca Will Brimer.  Twin to Jesse Brimer.

1777, 1st Volunteer Duty:
In July 1777, when 18, Pvt. William Brimer volunteered to fight in the American Revolution with the NC militia out of Wilkes County, NC, where he then lived, in a campaign under Capt. Jacob Free (Col. Armstrong's regiment; General Rutherford's brigade) against the Cherokees in the valley towns.

1778, 2nd Volunteer Duty: In  July 1778, he volunteered a second time in Wilkes County, NC under Capt. William Gilbreath (Colonel Buvard's regiment, General Rutherford's brigade) and marched to Moncks Corner SC which is near to Charleston SC to engage the British in Savannah, GA area.  Pvt. Brimer was discharged from this tour of duty on 9 April 1779.

1780, 3rd Volunteer Duty: In Sept. 1780 he volunteered yet again under Capt. Valentine Sevier (Col. John Sevier's regiment) in Washington County, NC (which is now part of  TN).  Fought as an "Overmountain Men" volunteer militia battle group in the famous October 1780 Battle of Kings Mountain (see Donna Cator's Mills/Redden line also). Again he served as a private. The Battle of Kings Mountain was a major victory for the patriots.  "William became part of Colonel Sevier's 240 man force" which joined other troops to pursue forces of British Lt. Col. Ferguson. Then he became a part of a 910 man battle force joining with 460 men from other units to become a 1370 force called  "Avenging Horde" that caught and decimated the British at the Battle of Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780.  This was an important battle in turning the tide in favor of American independence. 

Click on picture for full size map of Kings Mountain Battle Route 1780:


Drawing depicting the first gathering of militia volunteers at Sycamore Shoals
before their trek over the mountains and down to the Cow Pens area. 

Oil painting depiction of the Battle of Kings Mountain and how it took place as
the militiamen fought their way up the mountain, killing Patrick Ferguson in the
process, and taking prisoner both English soldiers and Tory sympathizers.  

                                                               British Lt. Col. Patrick Ferguson Killed

 

 

Militia Service in Revolutionary War:  Total of  14 to 15 months.

Kings Mountain is now a National Military Park 

GPS Coordinates per Mike Brimer:William Brimer stood here (see photo) when he and his group of militiamen were readying themselves to go up the mountain.  Approx. GPS grid coordinate is:  
35.14117N  81.37604W

 

 

 

1784:   Moved to Washington County, TN and married Elizabeth Elgin there It is possible that she is 1/2 Cherokee Indian.

1785:  Moved to Rutherford County NC.

1790:  Listed in Rutherford County NC 1790 Census records.

1795:  OUR LINE:  William and Elizabeth's son William S. Brimer, Hans' ggrandson, born. Note: Son William Brimer has a middle initial of "S" while the father did not.

1810:  William Brimer and family moved to Sevierville / Sevier County / Jefferson county area.   Brimer owned property on the south side of the large French Broad River.  Likely called "going to town" as being Sevierville because there was no river to cross to get to Sevierville.  He had one tax record in Sevier county; thereafter his property was actually just inside the county line of Jefferson County because the county boundaries were redrawn.  All the rest of his tax records were for Jefferson County which had as it county seat Dandridge, across the river!

1811 - 1824: William Brimer purchased several pieces of property on the south side of the French Broad River in Jefferson County between 1811 and 1824, beginning with one 121 acre property in 1811, then one 85.75 acre property in 1812, one 50 acre property in Jefferson County in 1824, and finally one 100 acre piece in 1825, for a total of approximately 386.75 acres. 

GPS Coordinates per Mike Brimer:
William Brimer's Farmland located at approximately 35.968703N / 83.428500W
William Brimer's farmland is now completely underwater from
a dam built in the 1940s.  This topography map shows it prior to flooding the land.  Also this map done in 1939 shows Flat Creek, along which William is buried:

1807 map that highlights the general area of William's properties in a yellow oval:. 

1939 USGS Map of William Brimer Property - Shady Grove (near Dandridge):

1832 July 27:  William Brimer  applied for a revolutionary war pension in 1834.  His affidavit stated his age as 73 years and that he volunteered  July 1777 while living in Wilkes County, NC under Captain Jacob Free (Colonel Armstrong's regiment, General Rutherford's brigade); in July 1778 he volunteered again in Wilkes County, NC under Captain William Gilbreath (Colonel Buvard's regiment, General Rutherford's brigade); Sep 1780, volunteered again in Washington County, NC [at time of affadavit had become TN], under Captain Valentine Sevier (Colonel John Sevier's regiment); fought at Battle of King's Mountain under Captain Sevier in General William Campbell's command; fought in total between 14 and 15 months.

1833 Feb 11:  Pension records awarded and indicate William Brimer received a total of $139.98 as of February 11 1833.  

1834:  Died July 16, 1834 Sevier County, TN.  Buried in Flat Creek area of Sevier County, TN http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncrevwtp/patriots/williambrimerar.htm

1834 Following William's Death: William's heirs gathered together to re-divide and then sell portions of his property to one another.   The "deeds," which sold property to both John and Vineyard, list all of William's children and the spouses of William's female children. 

Personal Observation of Mike Brimer: After William's death, 2 of the children wanted to stay local and farm his land, so parts were sold to each of them. In the meantime, some of his children moved away a bit. His widow Elizabeth was having financial difficulties, appealed for a widow's pension, and got it.

Link to Transcribed Deeds HERE.  The linked pdf is a recent transcription of very early handwritten copies of the deeds, which may be available on this site in the future.   These documents provide proof of family members.  

1835:   The 1835 TN Pension Roll shows William awarded for his duty as a NC Militia private, in the annual sum of $46.66 at age 75.  "The records also indicate that he had received a total of $139.98 as of February 11 1833."    His descendants are eligible for membership in patriotic organizations because of his service record.

1839:  March 4 affidavit of Elizabeth Brimer states she is 75 years old and a widow. 

1840 June 16: Application for Pension filed by Elizabeth Brimer.  She is unable to read/write so she signed her X before an acting Justice of the Peace in Sevier County, TN.  In this application she states that she "became acquainted with" and lived with William Brimer as "husband and wife" in1785. In 1840 she was a widow. 

 

1843:  Elizabeth is granted an annual widow's pension of $20.50 as of March 4, 1843.

    

1848 May 24:  Elizabeth (wife) died 24 May 1848 at home of her son Vineyard on Chestnut Hill, in Jefferson County, TN

  

 

NAVIGATION - Click on the following buttons to go to a selected generation of this Brimer lineage: 

OUR LINE:  TO GEN. #1:  Hans Brimer Immigrant

OUR LINE:  TO GEN. #2:  Benjamin Brimer (m. Rebecca Will) Hans' Son

OUR LINE:  TO GEN. #3:  William BrimerTwin (m. Eliz. Elgin) Hans' Grandson 
                                               Wm Brimer Kids Children of Wm & Eliz. Elgin Brimer

   TO GEN. #3:  Jesse BrimerTwin (m. Eleanor) Hans'Grandson

   TO GEN. #3:  Joseph BrimerBrother of William & Jesse Brimer; m. Celia Heard; Hans' Grandson

OUR LINE:  TO GEN. #4:  John & Sally Brimer Includes:
    OUR LINE: GEN. #4  John Brimer and Sally Parrott(e) of TN - Hans' GGrandson 
    OUR LINE: GEN. #5  Vineyard Rhoten "Rip" Brimer & Rhoda Miller of  TN - Hans' GGGrandson 
    OUR LINE: GEN. #6  George Washington Brimer & Emmaline Mount of TN - Hans' 4th GGrandson 
    OUR LINE: GEN. #7  Cora Eliza Brimer & John Wesley Russell of TN -  Hans' 5th GGranddaughter         

MIKE's LINE: TO GEN. #4: William S. Brimer  Hans' GGrandson
MIKE's LINE: GEN. #5  John Stewart BrimerJohn Stewart Brimer & Sparks Sisters of MO - Hans' GGGrandson 
MIKE's LINE:
 GEN. #6  
Stephen R. Brimer Stephen R. Brimer & Willa Angelina Inlow of MO - Hans' GGGGrandson 
MIKE's LINE:
 GEN. #7  Paul Tinsley BrimerPaul T. Brimer and Darlene Daniel of MO - Hans' GGGGGrandson

  Please share information.... Questions? Comments?

catorfamily@gmail.com                     sgm67@outlook.com

 

HOME

DNA Hill
DNA Heiskell
DNA Young DiggsHill Cousins

DNA Mundon
DNA Pippin Laycock

DNA Seymour

Shuford

Fuller Line

Cooper Line

OUR CATOR LINES
Our Cators
Our Hills
Our Greenfields
Stephenson/Cator
Our O'Tooles
Cator/Clifton
Cator/Liston
Mary Liston Cator
Cator/Tenley
Cator/Sheckolls
Maryland Maps
Cators: Photos
Cators: Censuses
Cator in Draft
Hill/Young
Ridgeway/Willett
Levi/Matty Ridgeway
Ridgeways: Census
Ridgeways: Graves
Misc. O'Tooles
OTHER CATOR LINES
 Cator/Baden/Minto
Minto
Cator/Colison
Cator/Ferguson
Cator/McGaha
Cator/Nanney
Cator/Prather
Cator/Sikes
Charles County Cators
Dorchester Cty Cators
Thomas B. Travers
Armstrong & Cator
Benjamin F Cator
Pratt/Carrie Cator
Richard Cators
Russian Cators
Samuel Cators
Wilmer "Tut" Cator
Cator Tidbits
LeForce/Meadors


Balch
Evans
Bennett/Eaton
Staples/ Eaton
Hiram Eaton/Winters
Hiram Eaton Timeline
Searsport ME
Titcomb/Dearborn
Jeremiah Titcomb
Dearborns
Drews/Tuttles
Corrina Maine Pt. 1
Corrina Maine Pt. 2
Corrina Maine Pt. 3

Durham & DeSpain
Cherokee Pippin
Smiths
Smith/Christopher
Pfiel

French: Bible

Karasaki
Avilla
Freitas

Genets
 Keyser & Bernert
Keyser & Gardner
Dirck Keyser
Bernerts
Keyser Book


Mills/Redden/Pettit
Mills: Census
Pendleton
Green Pendleton
Clarence Pendleton
Pendleton/Griffin
Griffin/Ellis
Pendleton/Porter
James H Pendleton

Placak
Russell/Brimer
Russell
Hans Brimer
Benjamin Brimer
William Brimer
Jesse Brimer
Joseph Brimer
Wm Brimer Kids
John & Sally Brimer
William S. Brimer
John Stewart Brimer
Stephen R. Brimer
Paul Tinsley Brimer

Southworth
Murray/Sayward
Orm de Ashton
d'Aubigny
Cunningham
HARRIMAN
Roix
Belfast ME
NY Southworth/Alden

Wolf
Replogle
Haag & Reider

 

1790 Census listing both a Benjamin and a Joseph Brimer living in Pendleton SC

 

Past contributors: Updated/corrected 10/26/10 (My thanks to "Shirley" for correcting a major error in the early years of this line. )

Updated/corrected  Thanks to Frank Anderson!

COWPENS BATTLEFIELD

Mike Brimer:  I took this picture at ground level in the middle of "The Cowpens" area near Kings Mountain.  This area was called the Cowpens because during that time farmers moved their cows to market and would temporarily keep them in this particular clearing because it was not only clear for grazing, but also completely surrounded by dense forest growth, acting as somewhat as a fence to keep the cows in. 
 
The Cowpens made for a perfect temporary campground and staging area for the Overmountain Men before sneaking on to Kings Mountain to surround and destroy the unsuspecting British force in October, 1780.   Three months later, in January 1781, this same area was the site of the stunning victorious Cowpens battle.  
 
That was when Militias from 6 different areas under the command of COL Daniel Morgan were being chased by the dastardly Tarleton.   Morgan led his group to the Cowpens open area, turned them around, deployed them and readied them to fight the oncoming British.  The British fell into Morgan's trap and were crushed.  Tarleton was last seen riding quickly away with several of his officers, leaving his men to their fate.

 

 

 

Copyright 2011-2016. All Rights Reserved.
Great effort has been taken for accuracy of information although this cannot be guaranteed.
Click here to send mail to Donna and Patrick Cator with questions or comments.
Visit Life Is a Celebration of Passionate Colors, named as a 2004-2005  "101 Best Websites for Writers" by WritersDigest.com  

Visit Caren Keyser's Art  

 

My Biography Writings on Biography
Snippets Blog

http://snippetbiographies.blogspot.com/